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Healthy Snack Tips

Healthy Snack Tips Active kids and grown ups alike need to top up their energy stores every couple of hours throughout the day. Healthy snacks made with real food are a must and can be easy to prepare. Many packaged…

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Three Ways To Avoid Overeating

Three Ways to Avoid Overeating at Meals Being on holidays, weekend catch ups and dinners out can be amazing and it’s really easy to overeat. And it’s not just the abundance of delicious food but also the people, theambiance and the wine. …

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Are You Eating Your Emotions?

Food is something that should bring us pleasure. When it is made with love and shared and enjoyed with family and friends for pretty much any reason. Celebrations, birthdays, weddings, funerals, having the neighbour pop in for a cuppa (my…

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[PART 3] The End To The Dinner Time Circus...

Rome wasn’t built in a day, and so neither were our family mealtime dramas solved overnight.

There certainly was an adjustment period and while I couldn’t go cold turkey on the sausages (my fear of my son “failing to thrive” was still very real) but we started with one thing at a time which was family dinners on weekends.

Just sitting together at the table was a big deal.

We were also ALL eating THE SAME MEAL. This was huge. I was only cooking once for the first time in forever. I offered up a few of the favourites but also new foods, which had to be tried with “three polite bites”.

No one was allowed to say Yuck.

Not everything worked all the time but being consistent and being patient did work.

When the kids knew it was dinner time, they knew they had to try everything - they didn’t have to like it, but they did have to try it.

They didn’t have to finish what was on their plate, but there was no option B in the form of yoghurt or fruit.

If mealtime was dragging out too long, I gave a 5-minute warning. If they couldn’t finish in 5 minutes, they couldn’t have been too hungry.

Snacks were limited, not an all afternoon snack-a-thon, so they weren’t hungry for dinner.

We made changes in baby steps as we all adjusted. Not everything worked all the time, but being consistent meant the kids knew what to expect and a more relaxed approach from me went a long way.

The dinner time circus is now a thing of the past. The kids know that we sit at the table and eat as a family.

They know and like a huge variety of foods and are much happier to try new things.

They know that to learn, grow and be active and play all the sports they do, they need a variety of healthy food.

They know what types of foods make up a healthy meal.

Meltdowns are few are and between and usually a result of being hangry.

It’s been years since I’ve had a call from the school about disruptive behaviour.

I know my kids are eating a good variety of nutritious foods, so I’m not bothered if they have the odd bit of junk food.

They know what healthy eating is and more importantly, they know how it makes them feel.

No headaches, meltdowns or sore tummies.

I’m teaching them to know the difference in how food makes them feel, so they are equipped to make good choices, rather than banning crappy foods altogether.

As we head into the teenage years, I know there will be fast food, fries and Cokes and that’s ok (not really but kind of...)
but knowing they can recognise the difference between a normal healthy meal and something they just eat occasionally with their friends is the key.

And letting them choose.

I’m confident that as adults they will have the knowledge and foundations of being able to put together an easy balanced meal.

The routines and habits we’ve created good habits as a family will be with them for life.

Knowing the struggle we had at meal times, I knew we weren’t the only family to be experiencing this. The more families I met and the more clients I saw in clinic made me realise that parents need to know there is a better way.

That’s why I created the Healthy Families program, to give parents a guide to be able to give their kids the best start in life. bit.ly/2T7Oje7

Good health starts with good nutrition and it’s up to us as parents to be the role models and teach our kids that healthy food doesn’t come out of a packet and that meals are made from scratch.

Eating healthy food is normal.

Now, this may sound overwhelming.

Where do you start?

Of course, no-one has time to be cooking healthy meals.

And what even is a healthy meal?

This is where I’ve broken it down for you and kept it simple. I want to make your life easier, not add to the guilt or the to-do list.

In the Healthy Families program I’ve broken down the nutrition fundamentals for you, so you can make small positive changes one step at a time, not to make you feel like a failure if it doesn’t work overnight.

It’s flexible enough to work for every family, depending on your tastes and what you have in the fridge. No running off on a treasure hunt for crazy ingredients and complicated recipes.

You’ll learn what makes up a healthy meal so you can make your own, or if you’re stuck for inspiration use ours. I’m on your side, guiding you through giving your family the best start to life.

I don’t think there are many parents who can’t say they don’t want the best for their kids. We all want our kids to grow up to be happy and healthy. Then we’d like them to be a rocket scientist, but it’s always happy and healthy at the top of the list.

How do we do this?

We start them off by giving their growing bodies every chance and everything they need to thrive.

To be energetic, engaged learners who are curious about the world and about what foods they are eating.

We need to be role models for them and then our health flourishes too.

So there’s really nothing you’ve got to lose.

We all need to eat, so we may as well be fuelling those growing bodies with the right foods to give them the best start to life.

What are you waiting for?

Join us now and turn your family into a Healthy Family.
livewirenutrition.com.au/online-programs/healthy-families-program/
[+save $100 using the coupon 'Happy100']
... See MoreSee Less

[PART 3] The End To The Dinner Time Circus...

Rome wasn’t built in a day, and so neither were our family mealtime dramas solved overnight. 

There certainly was an adjustment period and while I couldn’t go cold turkey on the sausages (my fear of my son “failing to thrive” was still very real) but we started with one thing at a time which was family dinners on weekends. 

Just sitting together at the table was a big deal. 

We were also ALL  eating THE SAME MEAL. This was huge. I was only cooking once for the first time in forever. I offered up a few of the favourites but also new foods, which had to be tried with “three polite bites”. 

No one was allowed to say Yuck.
 
Not everything worked all the time but being consistent and being patient did work. 

When the kids knew it was dinner time, they knew they had to try everything - they didn’t have to like it, but they did have to try it. 

They didn’t have to finish what was on their plate, but there was no option B  in the form of yoghurt or fruit.
 
If mealtime was dragging out too long, I gave a 5-minute warning. If they couldn’t finish in 5 minutes, they couldn’t have been too hungry. 

Snacks were limited, not an all afternoon snack-a-thon, so they weren’t hungry for dinner.
 
We made changes in baby steps as we all adjusted. Not everything worked all the time, but being consistent meant the kids knew what to expect and a more relaxed approach from me went a long way.
 
The dinner time circus is now a thing of the past. The kids know that we sit at the table and eat as a family. 
 
They know and like a huge variety of foods and are much happier to try new things. 
 
They know that to learn, grow and be active and play all the sports they do, they need a variety of healthy food. 
 
They know what types of foods make up a healthy meal. 

Meltdowns are few are and between and usually a result of being hangry. 
 
It’s been years since I’ve had a call from the school about disruptive behaviour.
 
I know my kids are eating a good variety of nutritious foods, so I’m not bothered if they have the odd bit of junk food. 
 
They know what healthy eating is and more importantly, they know how it makes them feel. 
 
No headaches, meltdowns or sore tummies. 

I’m teaching them to know the difference in how food makes them feel, so they are equipped to make good choices, rather than banning crappy foods altogether.
 
As we head into the teenage years, I know there will be fast food, fries and Cokes and that’s ok (not really but kind of...) 
but knowing they can recognise the difference between a normal healthy meal and something they just eat occasionally with their friends is the key. 
 
And letting them choose.
 
I’m confident that as adults they will have the knowledge and foundations of being able to put together an easy balanced meal. 

The routines and habits we’ve created good habits as a family will be with them for life.
 
Knowing the struggle we had at meal times, I knew we weren’t the only family to be experiencing this. The more families I met and the more clients I saw in clinic made me realise that parents need to know there is a better way. 
 
That’s why I created the Healthy Families program, to give parents a guide to be able to give their kids the best start in life. http://bit.ly/2T7Oje7
 
Good health starts with good nutrition and it’s up to us as parents to be the role models and teach our kids that healthy food doesn’t come out of a packet and that meals are made from scratch. 
 
Eating healthy food is normal.
 
Now, this may sound overwhelming. 

Where do you start? 

Of course, no-one has time to be cooking healthy meals. 

And what even is a healthy meal?
 
This is where I’ve broken it down for you and kept it simple. I want to make your life easier, not add to the guilt or the to-do list. 
 
In the Healthy Families program I’ve broken down the nutrition fundamentals for you, so you can make small positive changes one step at a time, not to make you feel like a failure if it doesn’t work overnight. 
 
It’s flexible enough to work for every family, depending on your tastes and what you have in the fridge. No running off on a treasure hunt for crazy ingredients and complicated recipes.
 
You’ll learn what makes up a healthy meal so you can make your own, or if you’re stuck for inspiration use ours. I’m on your side, guiding you through giving your family the best start to life.
 
I don’t think there are many parents who can’t say they don’t want the best for their kids. We all want our kids to grow up to be happy and healthy. Then we’d like them to be a rocket scientist, but it’s always happy and healthy at the top of the list.
 
How do we do this?
 
We start them off by giving their growing bodies every chance and everything they need to thrive. 

To be energetic, engaged learners who are curious about the world and about what foods they are eating.
 
We need to be role models for them and then our health flourishes too.
 
So there’s really nothing you’ve got to lose. 

We all need to eat, so we may as well be fuelling those growing bodies with the right foods to give them the best start to life.
 
What are you waiting for?
 
Join us now and turn your family into a Healthy Family.
https://livewirenutrition.com.au/online-programs/healthy-families-program/
[+save $100 using the coupon Happy100]

 

Comment on Facebook

GREAT post, and ha ha ha I love Lucy's face!!!

Food Allergies and Intolerances are on the rise.
So what's the difference between an allergy and an intolerance, what are the symptoms to look for and how are they diagnosed?

livewirenutrition.com.au/online-programs/healthy-families-program/
... See MoreSee Less

Food manufacturers care about selling products, they don't care about your health. They use some pretty sneaky tactics to trick you into thinking you're buying something healthy when it isn't necessarily so.

Here's what to watch for - and what to buy instead!

livewirenutrition.com.au/online-programs/healthy-families-program/
... See MoreSee Less

 

Comment on Facebook

Aleita Wolski I need to start reading labels 😂

Olivia Brooks

Excellent information makes me re think & read more labels before I buy 🤗👍thanks 🙏🏻 Kylie

Awesome Kylie, So great information to take on board there!! Who knew aye. Clever marketing by some!!

James Christensen Jenna Christensen

+ View previous comments

My Personal Struggle To Feed My Kids - Part 2

(This is for all the parents struggling out there, just know you're not alone)

I thought I had all the answers when it came to feeding a family.

Then my own three kids came along and turned everything I knew about nutrition and my world of healthy eating on its head.

They clearly did not get the memo…

To be honest mealtimes were a nightmare and I dreaded that time of the day. There were tears, tantrums, begging and bribing. That was just from me. I thought my glass of Chardy was my only friend.

The good, bad and the ugly went something like this:

· “Yuck” not very original, but on frequent replay

· The more effort into a meal, the less chance of it being eaten

· Kids being sent to bed without eating their dinner (usually following YUCK and a meltdown)

· Uneaten lunch boxes get recycled for afternoon tea…or back to school the next day.

· Uneaten dinner put back in the fridge and served up the next night.

· In desperation to get them to eat, at one point I was cooking 4 individual meals

· I lost count how many nights/weeks/months one kid had just sausages. I told myself it was OK because they were kanga bangas …#notreallyokay

· Cheese on toast or yoghurt for dinner, just so they ate something…oh it goes on!

As a nutritionist, I was supposed to have all the answers. I felt so guilty for not getting it right and I really felt that I’d failed as a Mum for not feeding my children properly.

I knew my kids weren’t getting the nutrition they needed. I knew I had to draw a line in the sand and reclaim my sanity.

The good news is I’ve been through the trenches, come out the other side and learned A LOT about keeping food simple and making it easy for myself.

If you’re ready to stop the torture of mealtime meltdowns, let me show you how.

With my three kids, I had three very different eaters. Even as littlies, none of them was the dream kid who sat down and ate everything put in front of them.

One of my boys was super sensitive to different textures, and occasionally still can be. He would roll food around and around in his mouth and take forever to swallow it. Waiting for him to finish was a slow form of torture and once I even put him to bed with his mouth full. He fell asleep and I had to scoop pieces of chewed lamb out of his mouth while he slept.

My daughter was far more interested in feeding the dog than feeding herself, so I had to watch her closely to make sure she ate. Her fussiness was selective and I’m sure inspired by her brothers as a way to guarantee my attention.

To this day though, she won’t eat fish. Unless we call it “chicken fish”. Potatoes are on the no go list unless they are called mash, crunchies (aka roast potatoes) or wedges. Whatever you do just don’t call them potatoes, she doesn’t like those. Same goes for tomatoes. She’s now 9. Surely she’s going to stop torturing us soon....

Now these two were a walk in the park compared to my other son. He was a non-eater. As a baby, he was great and gobbled up everything. Then in the lead up to his second birthday, his little lips clamped shut and he just refused.

He went from being a chubby bub to a super skinny toddler alarmingly fast as was labelled by the pediatrician as a “failure to thrive” baby.

I’ll never forget hearing those words.

My baby was failing to thrive, it cut me cut straight to the heart. I had failed as a Mum doing one of the most basic things. Feeding my child. How did I get it so wrong?

I was then on a mission to do whatever it took to get that kid to eat. I still didn’t choose the best path. I was looking any foods that would eat, so at least he was eating something.

He’s a smart kid and was onto this pretty quickly. Egg custards, sausages were two things he settled on and would happily eat, despite me offering up a ridiculous variety of foods.

So this is what he stuck to.

For a couple of years.

As long as he was eating these, I told myself at least he was eating something, so he would be OK.

Every now and then a new food was deemed OK but by the time he started school the range of food he would eat was incredibly limited.

His meltdowns were epic and lasted long beyond the terrible twos. He was a terrible sleeper.

Dinner time every single night was a battle.

I was making sausages for him, something else to cater for the texture sensitive son and something else for my daughter that didn’t include the foods she had decided not to eat.

Then I’d cook again when my husband got home.

Fast forward to starting school and he was constantly in trouble for being disruptive in the classroom. I’m sure the school had me on speed dial to let me know his latest misdemeanour.

At pick up time I used to hold my breath walking in and dreaded seeing his teacher scanning the parents as I knew she was headed my way.

We had all the blood tests, all the psych tests and they all came back “normal”.

The guilt I carried was enormous and I had huge feelings of failure. Even though I knew better, I still hadn’t made the connection between his behaviour and moods to his limited diet.

I knew something had to change though, because as a family we couldn’t keep going down this path.

It was around this time I went back to work.

My nutritionist hat was back on and bit by bit it began to dawn on me...he wasn’t getting the key nutrients he needed. Of course, with such a limited diet he wasn’t getting the variety of nutrients his body needed to thrive.

No multivitamin was replacing the benefit of real food.

I know this sounds like Captain Obvious and don’t you worry, I’ve had plenty of head slap moments, but I was living in survival mode and couldn’t see outside the trenches.

I had to change my approach.

I was the parent and I was letting my kids dictate how meal times would work.

I was the one in charge and needed to take back that charge.

I thought about what I would say to a client who came to see me. I would be giving them the tough love talk about how they are the parent, it’s their job to provide healthy food and it’s their kid's job to decide to eat it.

I really had to let this sink in.

How had I let things get so out of control?

I’d made things this way, and it was up to me to change them. Meal times in our house were going back to my terms. For the good of the whole family, not just that one kid.

What have been your biggest challenges when it comes to feeding your family? I’ve shared my dirty secrets, I’d love to know yours!

Stay tuned for the rest of the story - How I got my sanity back and turned our dinner time circus around once and for all.
... See MoreSee Less

My Personal Struggle To Feed My Kids - Part 2

(This is for all the parents struggling out there, just know youre not alone)

I thought I had all the answers when it came to feeding a family. 

Then my own three kids came along and turned everything I knew about nutrition and my world of healthy eating on its head.

They clearly did not get the memo…

To be honest mealtimes were a nightmare and I dreaded that time of the day. There were tears, tantrums, begging and bribing. That was just from me. I thought my glass of Chardy was my only friend.

The good, bad and the ugly went something like this:

· “Yuck” not very original, but on frequent replay

· The more effort into a meal, the less chance of it being eaten

· Kids being sent to bed without eating their dinner (usually following YUCK and a meltdown)

· Uneaten lunch boxes get recycled for afternoon tea…or back to school the next day.

· Uneaten dinner put back in the fridge and served up the next night.

· In desperation to get them to eat, at one point I was cooking 4 individual meals 

· I lost count how many nights/weeks/months one kid had just sausages. I told myself it was OK because they were kanga bangas …#notreallyokay

· Cheese on toast or yoghurt for dinner, just so they ate something…oh it goes on!

As a nutritionist, I was supposed to have all the answers. I felt so guilty for not getting it right and I really felt that I’d failed as a Mum for not feeding my children properly. 

I knew my kids weren’t getting the nutrition they needed. I knew I had to draw a line in the sand and reclaim my sanity. 

The good news is I’ve been through the trenches, come out the other side and learned A LOT about keeping food simple and making it easy for myself. 

If you’re ready to stop the torture of mealtime meltdowns, let me show you how.

With my three kids, I had three very different eaters. Even as littlies, none of them was the dream kid who sat down and ate everything put in front of them. 

One of my boys was super sensitive to different textures, and occasionally still can be. He would roll food around and around in his mouth and take forever to swallow it. Waiting for him to finish was a slow form of torture and once I even put him to bed with his mouth full. He fell asleep and I had to scoop pieces of chewed lamb out of his mouth while he slept.

My daughter was far more interested in feeding the dog than feeding herself, so I had to watch her closely to make sure she ate. Her fussiness was selective and I’m sure inspired by her brothers as a way to guarantee my attention. 

To this day though, she won’t eat fish. Unless we call it “chicken fish”. Potatoes are on the no go list unless they are called mash, crunchies (aka roast potatoes) or wedges. Whatever you do just don’t call them potatoes, she doesn’t like those. Same goes for tomatoes. She’s now 9. Surely she’s going to stop torturing us soon....

Now these two were a walk in the park compared to my other son. He was a non-eater. As a baby, he was great and gobbled up everything. Then in the lead up to his second birthday, his little lips clamped shut and he just refused. 

He went from being a chubby bub to a super skinny toddler alarmingly fast as was labelled by the pediatrician as a “failure to thrive” baby. 

I’ll never forget hearing those words. 

My baby was failing to thrive, it cut me cut straight to the heart. I had failed as a Mum doing one of the most basic things. Feeding my child. How did I get it so wrong?

I was then on a mission to do whatever it took to get that kid to eat. I still didn’t choose the best path. I was looking any foods that would eat, so at least he was eating something. 

He’s a smart kid and was onto this pretty quickly. Egg custards, sausages were two things he settled on and would happily eat, despite me offering up a ridiculous variety of foods. 

So this is what he stuck to. 

For a couple of years. 

As long as he was eating these, I told myself at least he was eating something, so he would be OK. 

Every now and then a new food was deemed OK but by the time he started school the range of food he would eat was incredibly limited.

His meltdowns were epic and lasted long beyond the terrible twos. He was a terrible sleeper. 

Dinner time every single night was a battle. 

I was making sausages for him, something else to cater for the texture sensitive son and something else for my daughter that didn’t include the foods she had decided not to eat. 

Then I’d cook again when my husband got home.

Fast forward to starting school and he was constantly in trouble for being disruptive in the classroom. I’m sure the school had me on speed dial to let me know his latest misdemeanour. 

At pick up time I used to hold my breath walking in and dreaded seeing his teacher scanning the parents as I knew she was headed my way. 

We had all the blood tests, all the psych tests and they all came back “normal”. 

The guilt I carried was enormous and I had huge feelings of failure. Even though I knew better, I still hadn’t made the connection between his behaviour and moods to his limited diet. 

I knew something had to change though, because as a family we couldn’t keep going down this path.

It was around this time I went back to work.

 My nutritionist hat was back on and bit by bit it began to dawn on me...he wasn’t getting the key nutrients he needed. Of course, with such a limited diet he wasn’t getting the variety of nutrients his body needed to thrive. 

No multivitamin was replacing the benefit of real food. 

I know this sounds like Captain Obvious and don’t you worry, I’ve had plenty of head slap moments, but I was living in survival mode and couldn’t see outside the trenches.

I had to change my approach. 

I was the parent and I was letting my kids dictate how meal times would work.

 I was the one in charge and needed to take back that charge. 

I thought about what I would say to a client who came to see me.  I would be giving them the tough love talk about how they are the parent, it’s their job to provide healthy food and it’s their kids job to decide to eat it. 

I really had to let this sink in. 

How had I let things get so out of control? 

I’d made things this way, and it was up to me to change them. Meal times in our house were going back to my terms. For the good of the whole family, not just that one kid.

What have been your biggest challenges when it comes to feeding your family? I’ve shared my dirty secrets, I’d love to know yours! 

Stay tuned for the rest of the story - How I got my sanity back and turned our dinner time circus around once and for all.

 

Comment on Facebook

Thanks so much for your share, Kylie. Didn’t we all have the answers, pre-kids?! I remember being in tears when every one of mine would refuse food as toddlers. So frustrating! And those episodes would induce so much guilt! Thankfully those days are behind us and we enjoy mostly smooth meal times. I love this post and it reminds us to make sure we’re always in the driver’s seat! Looking forward to seeing you in a few days x

I've got an 8 year old that won't eat cooked veges so broccoli cabbage peas brussel sprouts etc all get served cut up straight from the fridge won't eat fruit unless it's an apple and it can't have a single mark and has to be crunchy and even then sometimes it's "too sour" or "too soft" won't eat sauce of any kind and the jar sauces is out of the question will eat greens gravy though she will eat tomatoey based dishes like spag and chill as long as I purée the crushed the tomato so she can't see the chunks and I can purée other veges and hide them in gravy mince etc won't drink milk unless it's flavoured so breakfast a nightmare and eats breakfast bars happily eat her meat except roo and steak

Thanks for sharing your story my story is pretty much the same just I haven’t gained my sanity back yet and I never thought I can advice anyone as always felt like a failure My son is 11 and daughter 6 still the story continues tried tough love they ll rather go without food for days and weeks . So looking forward to your second part to get some inspiration

I have the same problems with my kids 2 older boys (13 & 8.5) will eat everything I give them daughter (12) has texture issues also 6yo son used to eat his veg first until 5yo decided he’d only eat nuggets, noodles, toast & meat 🤦🏽‍♀️ by far my worst eater mind you can eat 24 nuggets in one sitting 🙄 hopefully the baby eats like his older brothers Looking forward to the next instalment to see how you sorted this out

Jason Stone

the struggle is real!

Thanks for being so honest, hopefully in part 3 you e got your sanity back!

My 15 year old is still a battle. Such a limited list of foods he will eat. Your story is my story too 💖

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